lemon squeeze

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I first played this game in an anthropology class in high school, where we knew it as Lemon Squeeze. It’s interesting that in this description which John Gardner wrote in 1978, some of the people or even the categories (smoke) are not so familiar and not as useful. It would be more useful now for instance, if a question were, what kind of communication device would this person be? for people to quickly get the gist. But the main thing is how when you slide into this mode of imagination whose currency is metaphor, it opens up an evocative sense of the whole while honing in with precision on detail. Holding yourself with control and clarity while dilating another part of the mind, feeling your way into the task of describing or receiving the small picture and extrapolating it into the whole, bring on a mini-euphoria as the right answer detonates. A little bit of mind magic.

There is a game — in the 1950s it used to be played by members of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop — called ‘Smoke.’ It works as follows. The player who is ‘it’ chooses some famous person with whom everyone playing is surely acquainted (Harry Truman, Marlon Brando, Chairman Mao, Charles DeGaulle, for instance) and tells the other players, ‘I am a dead American,’ ‘I am a living American,’ ‘I am a dead Asian,’ ‘I am a dead European’; and then each of the other players in turn asks one question of the person who is ‘it,’ such as, ‘What kind of smoke are you?’ (cigarette, pipe, cigar — or, more specifically, L&M, Dunhill, White Owl) or ‘What kind of weather are you?’ ‘What kind of insect are you?’ or ‘What kind of transportation?’ The person who is ‘it’ answers not in terms of what kind of smoke his character would like, if any, but what kind of smoke he would be if, instead of being human, he were a smoke, or what kind of weather, insect, transportation, and so forth, he would be if reincarnated as one of those. Thus, for example, Kate Smith if an insect would be a turquoise beetle; Marlon Brando, if weather, would be sultry and uncertain, with storm warnings out; and as a vehicle of transporation Harry Truman would be (whatever he may in fact have driven) a Model T Ford. What invariably happens when this game is played by fairly sensitive people is that the whole crowd of questioners builds a stronger and stronger feeling of the character, by unconscious association, until finally someone says the right name — ‘Kate Smith!’ or ‘Chairman Mao!’ — and everyone in the room feels instantly that that’s right. There is obviously no way to play this game with the reasoning faculty, since it depends on unconscious associations or intuition; and what the game proves conclusively for everyone playing is that our associations are remarkably similar. When one of the players falls into some mistake, for instance, saing that Mr. Brezhnev of the U.S.S.R. is a beaver instead of, more properly, a crafty old woodchuck, all the players at the end of the game are sure to protest, ‘You misled us when you said “beaver.”‘ The game proves more dramatically than any argument can suggest the mysterious rightness of a good metaphor — the one requisite for the poet, Aristotle says, that cannot be taught.

John Gardner, On Moral Fiction

http://www.amazon.com/Moral-Fiction-John-Gardner/dp/0465052258/ref=sr_1_1_title_2_har?ie=UTF8&qid=1392055171&sr=8-1&keywords=on+moral+fiction+john+gardner+books

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